Max Heart Rate Calculator

Determines the maximum heart rate by 6 formulas to offer information on cardiac fitness.

In the text below the calculator there is more on the six formulas used and other guidelines.


The max heart rate calculator uses the subject’s age in years and 6 different formulas to determine the maximum heart rate obtainable given that age.

These standard values (in practice there are other individual variations) can be used to compare the cardiovascular function during exercise or to establish training zones.


The maximum heart rate (HRmax or MHR) is estimated through the following formulas:

1. Tanaka, Monahan, & Seals: HRmax = 208 − (0.7 × age)

2. Haskell and Fox formula: HRmax = 220 – age

3. Robergs & Landwehr formula: HRmax = 205.8 − (0.685 × age)

4. Gellish gender specific formulas:

men: HRmax = 203.7 / (1 + exp(0.033 × (age − 104.3) ) )

women: HRmax = 190.2 / (1 + exp(0.0453 × (age − 107.5) ) )

5. HRmax often attributed to “Londeree & Moeschberger - University of Missouri": HRmax = 206.3 − (0.711 × age)

6. HRmax often attributed to "Miller - Indiana University": HRmax = 217 − (0.85 × age)


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Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

HRmax formulas

This max heart rate calculator consists of six formulas that essentially determine the maximum heart rate through six different methods, some of which, quite similar.

These are used when a cardiac stress test cannot be performed but it is important to note that these are just estimations.

1. Tanaka, Monahan, & Seals: HRmax = 208 − (0.7 × age)

2. Haskell and Fox formula: HRmax = 220 – age

3. Robergs & Landwehr formula: HRmax = 205.8 − (0.685 × age)

4. Gellish gender specific formulas:

men: HRmax = 203.7 / (1 + exp(0.033 × (age − 104.3) ) )

women: HRmax = 190.2 / (1 + exp(0.0453 × (age − 107.5) ) )

5. HRmax often attributed to “Londeree & Moeschberger - University of Missouri": HRmax = 206.3 − (0.711 × age)

6. HRmax often attributed to "Miller - Indiana University": HRmax = 217 − (0.85 × age)

 

About the maximum heart rate

Heart rate can be defined as the speed of the heartbeat measured in beats (contractions) per minute.

The normal resting rate is between 60 and 80 bpm. However, this varies according to personal factors, even same age and gender people might have different measurements. For instance, athletes can experience as low as a 40 bpm resting heart rate.

General factors that influence heart rate include exercise, different stressors, sleep and even genetic determination.

Significant changes are often connected to some underlying disease. For example:

■ A slow heart rate may be caused by: underactive thyroid gland, heart disease, blood clots, diseases of the blood vessels etc.

■ A fast heart rate may be caused by: anemia, overactive thyroid gland, fever, stress, heart disease etc.

HRmax on the other hand, is the highest heart rate possible to achieve, usually during exercise of some kind. It is a measure of how much physical exertion the heart can withstand.

There are gender differences, for example women tend to have higher MHRs than men. Altitude can influence the potential MHR, by lowering it.

 

HRmax and fitness

A mistake often made is to confuse the value with a measure for level of body fitness. MHR doesn’t reflect it.

On the contrary, in some cases, with extended training, the heart manages to expand the blood and stroke volume, therefore needs less contractions to circulate blood.

Heart zones offer information about the exercise intensity percentage should be aimed at. These can be estimated based on the outcome of the training, i.e losing weight, building resistance or given the level of exercise:

Exercise frequency Percentage of MHR
Sedentary to no exercise 57-67%
Minimal activity 74-84%
Regular exercise 80-91%
High intensity exercise 84-94%
 

References

1. Tanaka H, Monahan KD, Seals DR. Age-predicted maximal heart rate revisited. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001; 37(1):153-6.

2. Robergs R, Landwehr R. The Surprising History of the 'HRmax=220-age' Equation (PDF) Journal of Exercise Physiology. 2002; 5 (2): 1–10.

3. Kolata G. 'Maximum' Heart Rate Theory Is Challenged. New York Times. 2001.

4. Gellish RL, Goslin BR, Olson RE, McDonald A, Russi GD, Moudgil VK. Longitudinal modeling of the relationship between age and maximal heart rate. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007; 39(5):822-9.

5. Jackson AS. Estimating maximum heart rate from age: is it a linear relationship? Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007; 39(5):821.


App Version: 1.0.1

Coded By: MDApp

Specialty: Cardiology

System: Cardiovascular

Objective: Calculation

Type: Calculator

No. Of Variables: 1

Abbreviation: MHR

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: March 15, 2017 · 10:06 PM

Last Checked: March 15, 2017

Next Review: March 9, 2018