Waist to Hip Ratio (WHR) Calculator

Determines the waist-hip ratio based on the two circumferences, which is an indicator that correlates with health risk and fertility.

Refer to the text below the calculator for more information about the WHR, its interpretation and predictive properties.


The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is a dimensionless ratio of the circumference of the wait to that of the hips, used as a body shape indicator and a measure of health risks and fertility.

Statistically, it was found that people who carry more weight around the waist (apple shaped bodies) are at a greater risk of developing serious health conditions than those who carry more weight around the hips (pear shaped bodies).


Waist-to-Hip Ratio formula

WHR = Waist circumference / Hip circumference

Both sizes should be in the same measurement unit.

Interpretation

  • According to WHO – abdominal obesity cut-off is a waist-hip ratio of above 0.90 for males and above 0.85 for females or a body mass index (BMI) of above 30.0.
  • The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) has devised a cut-off for increased health risk at waist-hip ratio of above 1.0 for males and above 0.80 for females.

Waist Circumference
Hip Circumference
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Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

Waist to Hip Ratio Explained

The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is a dimensionless ratio of the circumference of the wait to that of the hips, used as a body shape indicator and a measure of health risks and fertility.

The waist to hip ratio is an indicator obtained by dividing the circumference of the waist to that of the hips and it is often used to evaluate abdominal fat distribution.

WHR (W:H) = Waist circumference / Hip circumference

Where both are in the same measurement unit, whether English (inches) or Metric (centimetres).

 

Taking the measurements

According to WHO data gathering advice, the waist circumference should be measured at the midpoint between the lower margin of the last palpable ribs and the top of the iliac crest, using a stretch‐resistant tape.

Waist measurement can be also taken at the navel but research has shown these tend to underestimate true waist circumference.

Hip size should be measured around the widest portion of the buttocks, with the tape parallel to the floor.

The individual is also advised to stand with feet closed, arms at the side and body weight evenly distributed during the measurements. Each measurement should be repeated twice, in case there is within 1cm difference between the determinations, the average should be considered.

 

WHR interpretation

  • According to WHO – abdominal obesity cut-off is a waist-hip ratio of above 0.90 for males and above 0.85 for females or a body mass index (BMI) of above 30.0.
  • The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) has devised a cut-off for increased health risk at waist-hip ratio of above 1.0 for males and above 0.80 for females.

WHR has been statistically found to be a better predictor of mortality in older people, as well as better predictor of cardiovascular disease, than waist circumference alone or body mass index (BMI), however, more accurate estimates of body fat percentage remain the most accurate measure of relative weight.

In terms of fertility, a WHR of 0.9 for males and 0.7 for females was found to correlate strongly with general health and fertility. Women within the 0.7 range tend to have optimal levels of estrogen and are in consequence, less susceptible to cardiovascular disorders, diabetes or ovarian malignancy.

 

References

World Health Organization. Waist circumference and waist–hip ratio Report of a WHO expert consultation, Geneva. Geneva World Health Organization. 2011; 1-39.

Seidell JC. Waist circumference and waist/hip ratio in relation to all-cause mortality, cancer and sleep apnea. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010; 64(1):35-41.

Singh D. Body shape and women’s attractiveness. The critical role of waist-to-hip ratio. Human Nature. 1993; 4‚ 297-321.


Specialty: Fitness

Abbreviation: WHR

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: June 8, 2020

Last Checked: June 8, 2020

Next Review: June 8, 2025