Waist to Height Ratio (WHtR) Calculator

Measures healthy weight in a more accurate way than the BMI based on the ratio of the two body measurements.

Refer to the text below the calculator for more information about the waist-height ratio and its interpretation.


Statistical evidence supports that waist-height ratio is a better predictor of cardiovascular, diabetes and stroke risk than the body mass index (BMI) because it accounts for the distribution of abdominal fat, which is known to increase the aforementioned risks.

The rule of thumb for a healthy body and for supporting life expectancy is to aim keeping the waist circumference to less than half of the height, so the WHtR at less than 0.5.


Waist-to-Height Ratio = Waist Circumference / Height

Based on the waist to height ratio, body status can be classified as follows:

WHtR Classification Adult women Adult men Children <15 years
Extremely slim ≤ 0.34 ≤ 0.34 ≤ 0.34
Slim 0.35 – 0.41 0.35 – 0.42 0.35 – 0.45
Healthy 0.42 – 0.48 0.43 – 0.52 0.46 – 0.51
Overweight 0.49 – 0.53 0.53 – 0.57 0.52 – 0.63
Very overweight 0.54 – 0.57 0.58 – 0.62 -
Obese ≥ 0.58 ≥ 0.63 ≥ 0.64

Waist Circumference
Height
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Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

The Waist-Height Ratio Explained

The waist-to-height ratio, also called the waist-to-stature ratio (WSR) is the waist circumference divided by height, both measured in the same units, either Metric or English. The WHtR is a measure of fat distribution.

Waist-to-Height Ratio = Waist Circumference / Height

The waist circumference should be measured at the midpoint between the last palpable rib and the top of the iliac crest, using a stretch‐resistant tape.

Statistical evidence supports that WHtR is a better predictor of cardiovascular, diabetes and stroke risk than the body mass index (BMI) because it accounts for the distribution of abdominal fat, which is known to increase the aforementioned risks.

Abdominal fat affects organs like the heart, liver and kidneys more adversely in terms of cardiometabolic risk, than fat around the hips and bottom.

In a comprehensive study by Lee et al. that revised 10 studies, BMI was the poorest discriminator for cardiovascular risk factors whilst the WHtR was the best discriminator for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia in both sexes.

Waist-height ratio is considered a simpler and more predictive of the ‘early heath risks’ associated with central obesity. The rule of thumb for a healthy body and for supporting life expectancy is to aim keeping the waist circumference to less than half of the height, so the WHtR at less than 0.5.

 

WHtR Interpretation

Based on the waist to height ratio, body status can be classified as follows:

WHtR Classification Adult women Adult men Children <15 years
Extremely slim ≤ 0.34 ≤ 0.34 ≤ 0.34
Slim 0.35 – 0.41 0.35 – 0.42 0.35 – 0.45
Healthy 0.42 – 0.48 0.43 – 0.52 0.46 – 0.51
Overweight 0.49 – 0.53 0.53 – 0.57 0.52 – 0.63
Very overweight 0.54 – 0.57 0.58 – 0.62 -
Obese ≥ 0.58 ≥ 0.63 ≥ 0.64
 

References

Ashwell M, Gunn P, Gibson S. Waist-to-height ratio is a better screening tool than waist circumference and BMI for adult cardiometabolic risk factors: systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews. 2012; 13, pp.275–286.

Schneider HJ et al. The predictive value of different measures of obesity for incident cardiovascular events and mortality. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. 2010; 95(4), pp.1777–85.

Ashwell M, Gibson S. Waist-to-height ratio as an indicator of ‘early health risk’: simpler and more predictive than using a ‘matrix’ based on BMI and waist circumference. BMJ Open 2016; 6:e010159.

Browning LM, Hsieh SD, Ashwell M. A Systematic Review of Waist-To-Height Ratio as a Screening Tool for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes: 0·5 Could Be a Suitable Global Boundary Value. Nutr Res Rev. 2010; 23(2):247-69.

Lee CMY, Huxley RR, Wildman RP, Woodward M. Indices of Abdominal Obesity Are Better Discriminators of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Than BMI: A Meta-Analysis. J Clin Epidemiol. 2008; 61(7):646-53.


Specialty: Fitness

Abbreviation: WHtR

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: June 8, 2020

Last Checked: June 8, 2020

Next Review: June 8, 2025