Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) Calculator

Determines Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) based on your personal characteristics, level of activity and five different formulas, including revised Harris-Benedict.

Refer to the text below the tool for more information about how the total daily energy expenditure is determined from basal metabolic rate.


The TDEE is a term used to define the calories the body burns in a period of 24 hours, when exercise is taken into account. It is measured in kcal/day and is determined by multiplying BMR by a Physical Activity Level constant.

BMR (basal metabolic rate) is estimated by either of the below formulas, based on physical characteristics such as age, gender, weight and height.

  • Harris-Benedict;
  • Mifflin St. Jeor;
  • Revised Harris-Benedict;
  • Katch-McArdle;
  • Schofield.

  • Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) kcal/day = BMR x Physical Activity Level Constant

The activity constant includes any type of activity that consumes energy, whether we are referring to daily life or deliberate exercise routines.

To adapt your TDEE to your weight loss or gain goals you should:

  • Aim to reduce 500 to 700 calories below TDEE for weight loss;
  • Aim to consume 500 to 1000 calories above your TDEE for weight gain.

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1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

Total Daily Energy Expenditure Explained

The TDEE is a term used to define the calories the body burns in a period of 24 hours, when exercise is taken into account.

  • Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) kcal/day = BMR x Physical Activity Level Constant

BMR (basal metabolic rate) is estimated by either of the below formulas, based on physical characteristics such as age, gender, weight and height.

BMR Formula Gender Formula
Harris-Benedict Male 66.5 + 13.75 x W in kg + 5.003 x H in cm – 6.755 x A in years
Female 655.1 + 9.563 x W in kg + 1.85 x H in cm – 4.676 x A in years
Mifflin St. Jeor Male 10 x W in kg + 6.25 x H in cm – 5 x A in years + 5
Female 10 x W in kg + 6.25 x H in cm – 5 x A in years – 161
Revised Harris-Benedict Male 13.397 x W in kg + 4.799 x H in cm – 5.677 x A in years + 88.362
Female 9.247 x W in kg + 3.098 x H in cm – 4.330 x A in years + 447.593
Katch-McArdle Male BMR = 370 + 21.6 x LBM
LBM = 0.407 x W in kg+0.267 x H in cm – 19.2
Female BMR = 370 + 21.6 x LBM
LBM = 0.252 x W in kg + 0.473 x H in cm – 48.3
Schofield Male Age (10-17): 17.686 x (W in kg) + 658.2
Age (18-29): 15.057 x (W in kg) + 692.2
Age (30-59): 11.472 x (W in kg) + 873.1
Age (≥ 60): 11.711 x (W in kg) + 587.7
Female Age (10-17): 13.384 x (W in kg) + 692.6
Age (18-29): 14.818 x (W in kg) + 486.6
Age (30-59): 8.126 x (W in kg) + 845.6
Age (≥ 60): 9.082 x (W in kg) + 658.5

Whilst generally, BMR formulas account for similar variables, the Katch-McArdle one determines the BMR from the differences between lean body mass and body fat, so tends to be more accurate for a lean person.

BMR is the caloric requirement for the body to maintain it’s metabolic activity, respiration, circulation, digestion or thermogenesis. The BMR is estimated to be divided between the vital organs as follows:

  • Brain: 19%;
  • Heart: 7%;
  • Liver: 27%;
  • Kidneys: 10%;
  • Skeletal muscle: 18%;
  • Other organs: 19%.

Because the BMR only represents the calories burned by the body at rest, this number must be adjusted up by the activity multiplier. Physical Activity Level constants are taken from the following table:

Physical Activity Level Constant
Little / No exercise (Sedentary lifestyle) 1.200
Light Exercise (1-2 days/week) 1.375
Moderate Exercise (2-3 days/week) 1.462
Heavy Exercise (4-3 days/week) 1.55
Physical Job / Daily Exercise (6-7 days/week) 1.725
Intense Exercise / Professional Athlete (twice/day) 1.900

The activity constant includes any type of activity that consumes energy, whether we are referring to daily life or deliberate exercise routines.

To adapt your TDEE to your weight loss or gain goals you should:

  • Aim to reduce 500 to 700 calories below TDEE for weight loss;
  • Aim to consume 500 to 1000 calories above your TDEE for weight gain.
 

References

Harris J, Benedict F A Biometric Study of Human Basal Metabolism PNAS.1918; 4 (12): 370–3.

Mifflin, MD; St Jeor, ST; Hill, LA; Scott, BJ; Daugherty, SA; Koh, YO A new predictive equation for resting energy expenditure in healthy individuals. The American journal of clinical nutrition. 1990; 51 (2): 241–7.

McArdle W Essentials of exercise physiology. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2006; p.266.

Schofield WN. Predicting basal metabolic rate, new standards and review of previous work. Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1985;39 Suppl 1:5-41.

Roza AM, Shizgal HM. The Harris Benedict equation reevaluated: resting energy requirements and the body cell mass. Am J Clin Nutr. 1984; 40(1):168-182.


Specialty: Fitness

Abbreviation: TDEE

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: September 12, 2020

Last Checked: September 12, 2020

Next Review: September 12, 2025