Testosterone to Estradiol Ratio (T/E2) Calculator

Determines the T/E2 ratio as a measure of male health sexual function.

Refer to the text below the tool for more information about the T/E2 ratio.


The testosterone to estradiol ratio, also known as testosterone to estrogen ratio is one of the most commonly determined parameters of male sexual function. The T/E2 ratio uses the testosterone concentration in ng/dL and the estradiol concentration in pg/mL.


Parameter Normal values
Testosterone 300-1000 ng/dL
Estradiol 14-55 pg/mL
T/E2 Not defined*

*Whilst a normal reference range for the T/E2 ratio has not been defined, a value is considered to be acceptable as long as the testosterone and estradiol/estrogen concentrations are within their normal range.


Testosterone (T)
Estradiol (E2)
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Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

The T/E2 ratio

The testosterone to estradiol ratio, also known as testosterone to estrogen ratio is one of the most commonly determined parameters of male sexual function. The T/E2 ratio uses the testosterone concentration in ng/dL and the estradiol concentration in pg/mL.

  • T/E2 = Testosterone / Estradiol

Whilst a normal reference range for the T/E2 ratio has not been defined, a value is considered to be acceptable as long as the testosterone and estradiol/estrogen concentrations are within their normal range.

Parameter Normal values
Testosterone 300-1000 ng/dL
Estradiol 14-55 pg/mL
T/E2 Not defined

The effects and roles of testosterone in male health are well known whilst those of estradiol (modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis) are less known. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen were found to increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another.

Zheng et al. studied the relationship between the T/E2 ratio and chronic heart disease (CHD) on a sample of 55 male CHD patients and 60 healthy age-matched controls. The study found that the balance of the T/E2 ratio has a crucial role in modulating the effect of androgens on CHD in males.

van Koeverden et al. found that low T/E2 ratios in patients with manifest atherosclerotic disease were associated with an increased systemic inflammation and an increased risk of future major adverse cardiac events (MACE). These effects were also stronger in males with elevated BMI so there may be a link to aromatase activity in white fat tissues.

 

References

van Koeverden ID, de Bakker M, Haitjema S, et al. Testosterone to oestradiol ratio reflects systemic and plaque inflammation and predicts future cardiovascular events in men with severe atherosclerosis. Cardiovasc Res. 2019; 115(2):453-462.

Zheng HY, Li Y, Dai W, Wei CD, Sun KS, Tong YQ. Imbalance of testosterone/estradiol promotes male CHD development. Biomed Mater Eng. 2012; 22(1-3):179-185.

Gong Y, Xiao H, Li C, Bai J, Cheng X, Jin M, Sun B, Lu Y, Shao Y, Tian H. Elevated t/e2 ratio is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease in elderly men. PLoS One. 2013; 8(4):e61598.

Schulster M, Bernie AM, Ramasamy R. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function. Asian J Androl. 2016; 18(3):435-40.


Specialty: Endocrinology

System: Endocrine

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: July 27, 2020

Last Checked: July 27, 2020

Next Review: July 27, 2025