SNAP-IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale

Screens for symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and can help with monitoring progress too (two versions available: 18 or 26 items).

Refer to the text below the calculator for more information about the screening methodology and diagnosis cut-off points.


ADHD rating scales are an essential tool for diagnosis, evaluation and monitoring of the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children.

The Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham-IV questionnaire is addressed to children aged 6 to 18 years old and can be completed either by parents or teachers.

Questions on the SNAP-IV Rating Scale are based on the definition of ADHD provided by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).


SNAP-IV Score Interpretation

Symptoms severity Inattention Subset (q1 - 9) Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Subset (q10 - 18) Opposition/Defiance Subset (q19 - 26)
Symptoms not clinically significant < 13 < 13 < 8
Mild symptoms 13 –17 13 –17 8 –13
Moderate symptoms 18 –22 18 –22 14 –18
Severe symptoms 23 –27 23 –27 19 –24

Instruction: For each of the following statements, please select the point on the scale that you feel is most appropriate in describing the assessed individual.

0 = Not at all | 1 = Just a little | 2 = Quite a bit | 3 = Very much

1Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork or tasks
Not at allVery much
2Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
Not at allVery much
3Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Not at allVery much
4Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties
Not at allVery much
5Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Not at allVery much
6Often avoids, dislikes, or reluctantly engages in tasks requiring sustained mental effort
Not at allVery much
7Often loses things necessary for activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils or books)
Not at allVery much
8Often is distracted by extraneous stimuli
Not at allVery much
9Often is forgetful in daily activities
Not at allVery much
10Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
Not at allVery much
11Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
Not at allVery much
12Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate
Not at allVery much
13Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
Not at allVery much
14Often is “on the go” or often acts as if “driven by a motor”
Not at allVery much
15Often talks excessively
Not at allVery much
16Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
Not at allVery much
17Often hasdifficulty awaiting turn
Not at allVery much
18Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations/games)
Not at allVery much
19Often loses temper
Not at allVery much
20Often argues with adults
Not at allVery much
21Often actively defies or refuses adult requests or rules
Not at allVery much
22Often deliberately does things that annoy other people
Not at allVery much
23Often blames others for his or her mistakes or misbehaviour
Not at allVery much
24Often is touchy or easily annoyed by others
Not at allVery much
25Often is angry and resentful
Not at allVery much
26Often is spiteful or vindictive
Not at allVery much
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Instruction: For each of the following statements, please select the point on the scale that you feel is most appropriate in describing the assessed individual.

0 = Not at all | 1 = Just a little | 2 = Quite a bit | 3 = Very much

1Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork or tasks
Not at allVery much
2Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
Not at allVery much
3Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Not at allVery much
4Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties
Not at allVery much
5Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Not at allVery much
6Often avoids, dislikes, or reluctantly engages in tasks requiring sustained mental effort
Not at allVery much
7Often loses things necessary for activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils or books)
Not at allVery much
8Often is distracted by extraneous stimuli
Not at allVery much
9Often is forgetful in daily activities
Not at allVery much
10Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
Not at allVery much
11Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
Not at allVery much
12Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate
Not at allVery much
13Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
Not at allVery much
14Often is “on the go” or often acts as if “driven by a motor”
Not at allVery much
15Often talks excessively
Not at allVery much
16Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
Not at allVery much
17Often has difficulty awaiting turn
Not at allVery much
18Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations/games)
Not at allVery much
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About SNAP-IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale

ADHD rating scales are an essential tool for diagnosis, evaluation and monitoring of the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

The Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham-IV questionnaire is addressed to children aged 6 to 18 years old and can be completed either by parents or teachers.

Questions on the SNAP-IV Rating Scale are based on the definition of ADHD provided by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Some items refer to:

  • Difficulty focusing or paying attention;
  • Difficult staying still;
  • Fidgeting or squirming;
  • Being unable to wait;
  • Frequently interrupting;
  • Difficulty following tasks.

Both the 26 and 18-item versions of the SNAP-IV allow the respondent to score the child’s behaviors on the following scale:

  • Not at all (0);
  • Just a little (1);
  • Quite a bit (2);
  • Very much (3).

The total scores are interpreted through 3 subsets (SNAP-IV 26) or 2 subsets (SNAP-IV 18):

Symptoms severity Inattention Subset (q1 - 9) Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Subset (q10 - 18) Opposition/Defiance Subset (q19 - 26)
Symptoms not clinically significant < 13 < 13 < 8
Mild symptoms 13 –17 13 –17 8 –13
Moderate symptoms 18 –22 18 –22 14 –18
Severe symptoms 23 –27 23 –27 19 –24

An alternative score interpretation for the SNAP-IV 18 consists in an average of the scores obtained in the 2 subsets with the following cut-offs:

Subset Parent rated cut-off Teacher rated cut-off
Inattention Subset (q1 - 9) 1.78 2.56
Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Subset (q10 - 18) 1.44 1.78

The several versions of the SNAP-IV were found to show good reliability and validity across multiple different study cohorts.

In its original form, the SNAP-IV consists of 90 items that evaluate hyperactivity-impulsiveness and inattention, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as well as a variety of other psychiatric symptoms:

  • 1-10: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder inattention symptoms;
  • 11-20: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms;
  • 21-30: ODD symptoms;
  • 31-40: General childhood problems;
  • 41-80: Non-ADHD disorders;
  • 81-90: Academic performance and deportment.
 

References

Hall CL, Guo B, Valentine AZ, et al. The Validity of the SNAP-IV in Children Displaying ADHD Symptoms. Assessment. 2019; 1073191119842255.

Bussing R, Fernandez M, Harwood M, et al. Parent and teacher SNAP-IV ratings of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: psychometric properties and normative ratings from a school district sample. Assessment. 2008; 15(3):317-328.

Swanson JM. School-Based Assessment and Interventions for ADD Students. Irvine, CA: KC Publications; 1992.

Swanson J, Nolan W, Pelham WE. The SNAP rating scale for the diagnosis of attention deficit disorder. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association; Los Angeles. 1981.


Specialty: Pediatrics

No. Of Items: 18 / 26

Year Of Study: 1992

Abbreviation: SNAP-IV

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: July 6, 2020

Last Checked: July 6, 2020

Next Review: July 6, 2025