Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure (PCWP) Calculator

Estimates pulmonary capillary wedge pressure from peak mitral inflow E velocity and average septal and lateral velocities.

Refer to the text below the tool for more information about the formulas used and the PCWP interpretation.


Clinically, the PCWP is the pressure measured by wedging a pulmonary catheter with an inflated balloon into a small pulmonary arterial branch. It is frequently used to assess left ventricular filling, as an indication of left atrial pressure, and to assess mitral valve function.


  • e' (average) = (e' (lateral) + e' (septal)) / 2
  • PCWP = 1.24 x E / e' (average) + 1.9
Interpretation Mean PCWP E/e' ratio
Normal ≤ 12 < 8
Indeterminate Any value 8 - 15
Elevated > 12 > 15

Peak mitral inflow E velocity (E)
e' (lateral)
e' (septal)
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1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure Explained

Clinically, the PCWP is the pressure measured by wedging a pulmonary catheter with an inflated balloon into a small pulmonary arterial branch. It is frequently used to assess left ventricular filling, as an indication of left atrial pressure, and to assess mitral valve function.

  • e' (average) = (e' (lateral) + e' (septal)) / 2
  • PCWP = 1.24 x E / e' (average) + 1.9

Mitral annular e' velocity can be measured in the apical 4-chamber view at either medial (septal) or lateral annulus.

PCWP may be interpreted as follows:

Interpretation Mean PCWP E/e' ratio
Normal ≤ 12 < 8
Indeterminate Any value 8 - 15
Elevated > 12 > 15

PCWP measurements may be used to:

  • Assess the severity of mitral stenosis;
  • Diagnose pulmonary arterial hypertension;
  • Differentiate between cardiogenic pulmonary edema and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema;
  • Differentiate between different forms of shock.
 

References

Original reference

Nagueh SF, Middleton KJ, Kopelen HA, Zoghbi WA, Quiñones MA. Doppler tissue imaging: a noninvasive technique for evaluation of left ventricular relaxation and estimation of filling pressures. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997; 30(6):1527-1533.

Other references

Ma TS, Bozkurt B, Paniagua D, Kar B, Ramasubbu K, Rothe CF. Central venous pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure: fresh clinical perspectives from a new model of discordant and concordant heart failure. Tex Heart Inst J. 2011; 38(6):627-38.

Tedford RJ, Hassoun PM, Mathai SC, Girgis RE, Russell SD, Thiemann DR, Cingolani OH, Mudd JO, Borlaug BA, Redfield MM, Lederer DJ, Kass DA. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure augments right ventricular pulsatile loading. Circulation. 2012; 125(2):289-97.


Specialty: Cardiology

System: Cardiovascular

Year Of Study: 1997

Abbreviation: PCWP

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: July 16, 2020

Last Checked: July 16, 2020

Next Review: July 16, 2020