Heart Rate Calculator

Estimates target heart rate, maximum heart rate and reserve, all in beats per minute based on age, resting heart rate and intensity.

There is in depth information on the formulas used and how to calculate all the heart rate values in the text below the tool.


The heart rate calculator determines the following:

■ Ideal Target Heart Rate (THR);

■ Target Heart Rate Range (60-80% intensity);

■ Maximum Heart Rate for given age;

■ Heart Rate Reserve.

The variables required for the calculation are subject age, resting heart rate (determined after waking up), fitness intensity (or heart zone of interest), in this case 60-80%.

The user then selects from the three available formulas for max heart rate: Tanaka, Monahan & Seals; Haskell and Fox; Robergs and Landwehr.


The maximum heart rate formulas used are:

■ Tanaka, Monahan & Seals: 208 − (0.7 * Age in years)

■ Haskell and Fox: 220 − Age in years

■ Robergs and Landwehr: 205.8 – (0.685 * Age in years)

The Karvonen method:

■ Step 1. Maximum heart rate (MHR): 220 – Subject age;

■ Step 2. Heart rate reserve: difference between the above MHR and resting heart rate;

■ Step 3. Target heart rate range (minimum): MHR x 0.6;

■ Step 4. Target heart rate range (maximum): MHR x 0.8;

■ Step 5. Ideal average THR: (min THR + max THR)/2.


Age:*
Resting heart rate:*
Intensity:
Max. heart rate formula:
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Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

Heart rate guidelines

The heart rate calculator compiles all the relevant heart rate measurements.

In terms of patient variables, the formulas only require the age and the heart rate at rest. This is normally between 60 and 100 beats per minute and provides an idea of the cardiac fitness.

The exercise intensity percentage depends on the heart rate zone of interest, example of which is provided below:

Zone Description Intensity % of MHR
5 VO2 max Maximal 90 - 100
4 Anaerobic Very Intense 80 - 90
3 Aerobic Intense 70 - 80
2 Endurance Moderate 60 - 70
1 Recovery Light 50 - 60

The maximum heart rate (MHR) is defined as the fastest rate at which the heart can function in one minute, usually encountered during physical exertion.

It is determined by genes and accounts for age and training condition.

The formulas used for maximum heart rate are:

■ Tanaka, Monahan & Seals formula = 208 − (0.7 x Age in years)

■ Haskell and Fox formula = 220 − Age in years (this is the most commonly used, also in the Karvonen method)

■ Robergs and Landwehr formula= 205.8 – (0.685 x Age in years)

The Karvonen equation is used to find out the target heart rate, based on the application of the following steps:

■ Step 1. Maximum heart rate (MHR): Age is extracted from 220;

■ Step 2. Heart rate reserve: difference between the above MHR and resting heart rate;

■ Step 3. Target heart rate range (minimum): MHR x 0.6;

■ Step 4. Target heart rate range (maximum): MHR x 0.8;

■ Step 5. Ideal average THR: (min THR + max THR)/2.

 

References

1. Karvonen J, Vuorimaa T. Heart rate and exercise intensity during sports activities. Practical application. Sports Med. 1988; 5(5):303-11.

2. Tanaka H, Monahan KD, Seals DR. Age-predicted maximal heart rate revisited. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001; 37(1):153-6.

3. Robergs R, Landwehr R. The Surprising History of the 'HRmax=220-age' Equation (PDF) Journal of Exercise Physiology. 2002; 5 (2): 1–10.

4. Kolata G. 'Maximum' Heart Rate Theory Is Challenged. New York Times. 2001.


App Version: 1.0.1

Coded By: MDApp

Specialty: Cardiology

System: Cardiovascular

Objective: Assessment

Type: Calculator

No. Of Variables: 4

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: March 15, 2017 · 09:51 PM

Last Checked: March 15, 2017

Next Review: March 9, 2018