Cholesterol Ratio Calculator

Determines TC/HDL and the LDL/HDL ratio to evaluate risk of cardiovascular disease.

Refer to the text below the tool for more information on each of the optimum values for cholesterol components and their ratios.


This cholesterol ratio calculator evaluates cardiovascular risk by checking the TC/HDL ratio and the LDL/HDL ratio, as well as cholesterol values (TC, HDL, LDL) and triglycerides against normal ranges for each gender.

Cholesterol levels are tested through blood cholesterol or lipid panel tests, and such investigations are recommended every 5 years between the ages of 20 and 45 and after more frequently. The relation between the different forms of cholesterol provides an indication of heart disease risk and also an indication on the measures to be taken to reduce that risk.


Optimal TC/HDL ratios are less than 3.4 for men and less than 3.3 for women:

Total Cholesterol/ HDL LDL/HDL Risk
Male Female Male Female
<3.4 <3.3 <1.1 <1.5 A very low risk
3.5 – 4.4 3.4 – 4.1 - - Low risk
4.5 – 7.2 4.2 – 5.7 1.2 – 4.9 1.6 – 4.1 Average risk
7.2 – 16.5 5.8 – 9 5 – 7.1 4.2 – 5.5 Moderate risk
>16.6 >9.1 >7.2 >5.6 High risk

Instruction: Please fill in at least 3 of the 4 fields below then press Calculate to determine the fourth value, the TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios and an interpretation of your cholesterol levels.

Total Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Gender
  Embed  Print  Share 

Send Us Your Feedback

Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios

Total Cholesterol is made out of High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL).

The Total Cholesterol / HDL ratio and the LDL / HDL ratio can indicate coronary heart disease and stroke risk. In general, the higher the ratio, the greater the health risks.

For men, an acceptable TC/HDL ratio is less than 5.0 whilst for women is less than 4.5. Optimal TC/HDL ratios are less than 3.4 for men and less than 3.3 for women.

Total Cholesterol/ HDL LDL/HDL Risk
Male Female Male Female
<3.4 <3.3 <1.1 <1.5 A very low risk
3.5 – 4.4 3.4 – 4.1 - - Low risk
4.5 – 7.2 4.2 – 5.7 1.2 – 4.9 1.6 – 4.1 Average risk
7.2 – 16.5 5.8 – 9 5 – 7.1 4.2 – 5.5 Moderate risk
>16.6 >9.1 >7.2 >5.6 High risk

Cholesterol levels are tested through blood cholesterol or lipid panel tests, and such investigations are recommended every 5 years between the ages of 20 and 45 and after more frequently.

 

Cholesterol values and cardiovascular risk

Cholesterol is a fatty substance in circulation in the body with multiple functions in the body such as those in cell metabolism and the production of hormones.

As it cannot dissolve in blood, it requires a carrier protein. There are two such types that carry cholesterol, one that is a high density and one that is a low-density lipoprotein:

  • HDL cholesterol, carried by the high-density lipoprotein, is known as the good cholesterol as it tends to carry cholesterol away from arteries, therefore, higher levels of HDL are said to prevent arterial clogging and decrease cardiac risk.
  • LDL cholesterol, carried by the low-density lipoprotein, is known as the bad cholesterol as it tends to build up on the blood vessel walls, leading to clogging of the coronary arteries and increased risk of heart attack.

Triglycerides are the preferred fat storage form and are used for energy release, especially in the muscles. In combination with high total cholesterol, high values increase cardiac risk.

Parameter Normal values Near Optimal values Borderline cardiovascular risk High cardiovascular risk
Total Cholesterol <200 mg/dl - 200 - 239 mg/dl ≥240 mg/dl
HDL Cholesterol >60 mg/dl - 40 - 60 mg/dl <40 mg/dl
LDL Cholesterol <100 mg/dl 100 - 129 mg/dl 130 - 160 mg/dl >160 mg/dl
Triglycerides <130 mg/dl 130 – 149 mg/dl 150 - 200 mg/dl >200 mg/dl

Results of cholesterol blood tests of lipid panel may be disrupted by therapy (with antibiotics, diuretics, corticosteroids or HRT) or by conditions such as liver disease, diabetes, pregnancy, infections or heart disease.

 

References

Lecerf JM, de Lorgeril M. Dietary cholesterol: from physiology to cardiovascular risk. Br J Nutr. 2011; 106 (1): 6–14.

Lemieux et al. Total Cholesterol/HDL Cholesterol Ratio vs LDL Cholesterol/HDL Cholesterol Ratio as Indices of Ischemic Heart Disease Risk in Men. Arch Intern Med. 2001; 161(22):2685-2692.

Millán et al. Lipoprotein ratios: Physiological significance and clinical usefulness in cardiovascular prevention. Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2009; 5: 757–765.


Specialty: Nutrition

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: June 12, 2020

Last Checked: June 12, 2020

Next Review: June 12, 2025