Carbs Calculator - Daily Carbohydrate Intake

Determines the recommended daily carbohydrate intake for your age, height and weight, whether you want to lose, maintain or gain weight.

Refer to the text below the tool for more information about the formulas and rules used in determining the daily carbs.


Carbohydrates, along with proteins and fats, form the macronutrients we require in our daily diets. Carbs are present in most foods or fruit and comes either as starches, fibers or sugars.

The recommendation for a balanced diet states that carbs should form approximately 45% to 65% of daily calorie intake. It is also important to note that 4 grams of carbohydrates produce 4 kcalories.


Upon determining the daily calorie recommendation based on the Mifflin-St Jeor gender specific formulas, a percentage of 45 to 65% can be applied to determine the necessary of daily calories from carbohydrates. If this value is divided by 4 (because 1 g of carb = 4kcal) then the daily grams of carbs can be obtained.

  • BMR (Females) = 10 x Weight (kg) + 6.25 x Height (cm) - 5 x Age (years) + 5
  • BMR (Males) = 10 x Weight (kg) + 6.25 x Height (cm) - 5 x Age (years) – 161

Age
Gender
Weight
Height
Carbohydrate intake in diet %
Number of meals per day
Activity level
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Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

Daily Carbohydrate Intake

Carbohydrates, along with proteins and fats, form the macronutrients we require in our daily diets. Carbs are present in most foods or fruit and comes either as starches, fibers or sugars. The recommendation for a balanced diet states that carbs should form approximately 45% to 65% of daily calorie intake. It is also important to note that 4 grams of carbohydrates produce 4 kcalories.

Different diets may account for different carbohydrate percentages out of the total calories, for example:

  • Ketogenic diet – 10%;
  • Zone diet – 40%;
  • Low fat diet – 60%;
  • Low carb diet – 25%.

Upon determining the daily calorie recommendation based on the Mifflin-St Jeor gender specific formulas, a percentage of 45 to 65% can be applied to determine the necessary of daily calories from carbohydrates. If this value is divided by 4 (because 1 g of carb = 4kcal) then the daily grams of carbs can be obtained.

  • BMR (Females) = 10 x Weight (kg) + 6.25 x Height (cm) - 5 x Age (years) + 5
  • BMR (Males) = 10 x Weight (kg) + 6.25 x Height (cm) - 5 x Age (years) – 161

This determination can be further customized by accounting for the activity level, so that the daily calories can be accurately estimated (the BMR value is indexed based on the activity level variable). The activity level options are:

  • No or little exercise/sedentary;
  • Easy exercise (2-3 times/week);
  • Moderate exercise (4 times/week);
  • Active exercise (5 times/week);
  • Very active exercise (5 times intense/week);
  • Day by day exercise;
  • Day by day intense exercise/twice daily;
  • Daily exercise and physical activity/job;

The daily carbohydrate calorie intake or grams, determined by the BMR formula indexed by level of activity is best fitted for maintaining current weight. In some cases, the subject may require to first determine their ideal weight, to check whether they require to lose or gain weight to reach it.

Weight loss and weight gain recommendations for the daily calorie and grams of carbohydrate are also provided, accounting for the rule of thumb that healthy weight loss means losing 1 lbs/week.

However, it is important to note that the type of carbohydrate ingested, not only the quantity, will influence the rate and success of weight loss, so one should steer clear from refined grains or added sugars.

 

References

Slavin J, Carlson J. Carbohydrates. Adv Nutr. 2014; 5(6):760-1.

Brand-Miller J, McMillan-Price J, Steinbeck K, Caterson I. Carbohydrates--the good, the bad and the whole grain. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008; 17 Suppl 1:16-19.

Thompson ME, Noel MB. Issues in Nutrition: Carbohydrates. FP Essent. 2017; 452:26-30.

Merchant AT, Vatanparast H et al. Carbohydrate intake and overweight and obesity among healthy adults. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009; 109(7):1165-72.

Frankenfield D, Roth-Yousey L, Compher C. Comparison of predictive equations for resting metabolic rate in healthy nonobese and obese adults: a systematic review. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005; 105(5):775-789.


Specialty: Nutrition

System: Digestive

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: July 27, 2020

Last Checked: July 27, 2020

Next Review: July 27, 2025