Albumin Creatinine Ratio Calculator

Detects amounts of protein in urine to check renal function and monitor chronic kidney disease.

Refer to the text below the tool for more information about its interpretation.


The Albumin Creatinine Ratio is the method employed to detect small amounts of albumin (protein) in the urine. Proteinuria and microalbuminuria are both signs of renal impairment and considered risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Its measurement is also part of diagnosis, staging and monitoring of chronic kidney disease (CKD).


Albumine Creatinine Ratio = Albumin in mg/dL / Creatinine in g/dL

Interpretation in chronic kidney disease (CKD)

Category ACR (mg/g) Description
A1 < 30 Normal to mildly increased
A2 30 – 300 Moderately increased
A3 > 300 Severely increased

Urine Albumin
Urine Creatinine
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Steps on how to print your input & results:

1. Fill in the calculator/tool with your values and/or your answer choices and press Calculate.

2. Then you can click on the Print button to open a PDF in a separate window with the inputs and results. You can further save the PDF or print it.

Please note that once you have closed the PDF you need to click on the Calculate button before you try opening it again, otherwise the input and/or results may not appear in the pdf.


 

Albumin Creatinine Ratio Explained

The Albumin Creatinine Ratio is the method employed to detect small amounts of albumin (protein) in the urine. Proteinuria and microalbuminuria are both signs of renal impairment and considered risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Its measurement is also part of diagnosis, staging and monitoring of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Albumin-to-creatinine ratio is the first method of preference to detect elevated protein and is calculated by dividing albumin concentration in milligrams by creatinine concentration in grams.

  • Albumin Creatinine Ratio = Albumin in mg/dL / Creatinine in g/dL

Interpretation in chronic kidney disease (CKD)

Category ACR (mg/g) Description
A1 < 30 Normal to mildly increased The normal urine ACR in young adults is less than 10 mg/g.
A2 30 – 300 Moderately increased Microalbuminuria is albumin excretion above normal range but below level of detection by total protein tests.
A3 > 300 Severely increased Macroalbuminuria indicates a higher elevation of albumin associated with progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate.

Patients with diabetes, hypertension, acute kidney injury, cardiovascular disease, recurrent renal calculi or family history of end-stage kidney disease should be tested for proteinuria via Albumin Creatinine Ratio.

Healthy individuals excrete very small amounts of protein in urine, so an increased excretion of urinary albumin (albuminuria) is a marker of kidney damage. Persistent increased protein in the urine (two positive tests over 3 or more months) is the principal marker of kidney disease.

This ratio is more sensitive than Protein-Creatinine for detecting low levels of proteinuria (i.e. negative/1+ protein on reagent strip) and is recommended in screening patients with diabetes.

 

References

Erman A, Rahamimov R, Mashraki T, Levy-Drummer RS, Winkler J, David I, Hirsh Y, Gafter U, Chagnac A. The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio: assessment of its performance in the renal transplant recipient population. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011; 6(4):892-7.

Derhaschnig U et al. Microalbumin measurement alone or calculation of the albumin/creatinine ratio for the screening of hypertension patients? Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 17, Issue 1, 2002, Pages 81–85.

Schwab SJ, Christensen RL, Dougherty K, Klahr S. Quantitation of proteinuria by the use of protein-to-creatinine ratios in single urine samples. Arch Intern Med. 1987; 147(5):943-4.

Martin H. Laboratory Measurement of Urine Albumin and Urine Total Protein in Screening for Proteinuria in Chronic Kidney Disease. Clin Biochem Rev. 2011; 32(2): 97–102.


Specialty: Nephrology

System: Urinary

Article By: Denise Nedea

Published On: June 17, 2020

Last Checked: June 17, 2020

Next Review: June 17, 2025